Sunday, 23 April 2017

The Non-Native Teacher by Peter Médgyes 3rd edition

Celebrating that I have in my hands the third edition of The Non-Native Teacher, a book I read back in 1994 when it was first published and which many of my then student teachers will surely remember. Thank you so much, Peter Médgyes and Susan Holden for this present. And thank you Enda Scott for bringing it all the way from Glasgow!


1st TESOL-SPAIN/ APEOI-A Joint event in Málaga













Friday, 14 April 2017

The view of the child in an ELT context

The default position of most training is focused on the adult. As many teachers are required to teach children, their view of the learner needs to expand. This talk will present data which reveals that teachers have rarely developed a philosophy of the child, and will present techniques to help them consider children as active participants in their own learning.



The view of the child in an ELT context

Sunday, 9 April 2017

Plenary session by Imtiaz Dharker

Imtiaz Dharker is a poet, artist and documentary film-maker. Awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry in 2014, recipient of the Cholmondley Award and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, her collections include Purdah (Oxford University Press), Postcards from god, I speak for the devil and The terrorist at my table (all published by Penguin India and Bloodaxe Books UK), Leaving Fingerprints and Over the Moon (Bloodaxe Books UK). Her poems are on the British GCSE and A-Level English syllabus, and she reads with other poets at Poetry Live! events all over the country to more than 25,000 students a year. She has been Poet in Residence at Cambridge University Library, for Thresholds, and has recently completed a series of poems based on the Archives of St Paul’s Cathedral. She has had ten solo exhibitions of drawings in India, London, New York and Hong Kong. She scripts and directs films, many of them for nongovernment organisations in India, working in the area of shelter, education and health for women and children.
Over the moon
Imtiaz Dharker will read from her new Glasgow poems as well as Over the Moon. These are poems about music and feet, church bells, beds, café tables, bad language and sudden silence. In contrast with her previous work written amidst the hubbub of India, these new poems are mostly set in Britain, where she has built a new life with – and since the death of – her husband Simon Powell.
‘This is a passionate, uplifting collection of poems about language, love and loss, grief and joy, elegy and celebration. The loss of a great love makes poems of piercing beauty. In her finest book to date, Imtiaz Dharker finds resolution in language itself, and in a world the more loved for the sharpness of loss.’ Gillian Clarke
‘Imtiaz Dharker’s new collection is the crown to a celebratory, humane, wholly utterable, subtly crafted poetry. Reading her, one feels that were there to be a World Laureate, Imtiaz Dharker would be the only candidate.’ Carol Ann Duffy


Plenary session by Imtiaz Dharker

Integrating plurilingual practices in ELT in a superdiverse world

With globalization and immigration, ELT approaches that recognize and value diversity are needed. Plurilingualism is one approach that offers several benefits to English learners, but practice is still a challenge. In this talk, participants will learn about plurilingual tasks and projects that can be implemented in their own context. Plurilingual ELT represents a world that is diverse and inclusive.



Integrating plurilingual practices in ELT in a superdiverse world

Plenary session by Jane Setter

Where angels fear to tread: intonation in English language teaching
Intonation is one of the earliest acquired aspects of speech; the crymelodies of infants are influenced by the intonation of their mothers, and very small toddlers are able to use intonation to indicate turntaking patterns in play conversations before they can form words. It plays a vital role in successful communication in English, as it does in other languages. If this is true, why is intonation neglected in English language pronunciation teaching, and how can it be taught effectively? This presentation takes the audience into the seldom-navigated region of intonation in English language teaching, focusing on the role of three main elements: tonality, tonicity and tone. Drawing on material from a number of different sources, we explore the role of intonation in English, and look at which elements are teachable, which are learnable, what resources are available to the teacher and the learner, and how intonation might be approached in the English language classroom and as a self-access learning activity. Expect a multimedia, audience participation experience.


Plenary session by Jane Setter

How communication psychology can make us better teachers

As ELT specialists, our focus is on our students’ language and communication skills. What about our own communication? How do we attend to that? This talk will highlight how a teacher’s communication style can enhance or hinder learner engagement. Practical concepts from communication psychology and intercultural communication that support classroom interaction and participation will be demonstrated.



How communication psychology can make us better teachers

Teaching young learners: all just fun and games?

Presenter(s): 
Marianne Nikolov
David Nunan
Antonella Sorace
Piotr Steinbrich
Ipek Bulduk Cooley




Session details:
As the starting age for English language learning around the world is getting younger, it’s time to take stock and ask the questions: Is there any evidence to support the benefits of starting a language as early as possible? We'll address what you can expect the youngest of learners to achieve.


Teaching young learners: all just fun and games?

Let's listen to the learners

Brian Tomlinson: In this presentation, I will present the case for listening both to what language learners have to say about the materials they would like to use and to what they have to say about themselves, about their ideas, their views and about their world. I will refer to successful examples of listening to learners and suggest other ways of listening.



Let's listen to the learners

Friday, 7 April 2017

The view of the child in an ELT context

The default position of most training is focused on the adult. As many teachers are required to teach children, their view of the learner needs to expand. This talk will present data which reveals that teachers have rarely developed a philosophy of the child, and will present techniques to help them consider children as active participants in their own learning.



The view of the child in an ELT context

Thursday, 6 April 2017

Interview with Lindsay Clandfield and Jill Hadfield

Lindsay Clandfield and Jill Hadfield talk about different kinds of online interaction and techniques that encourage learners to interact with each other in line courses.



Interview with Lindsay Clandfield and Jill Hadfield

interview with Peter Medgyes and Susan Holden

Peter Medgyes and Susan Holden talk about the ELT journal debate on the value of English as a lingua franca and the relevance to teachers and learners. They also spoke about the timely revision of Peter’s book The Non Native Teacher and how this global topic is again becoming interesting and relevant for policy makers, school leaders, teachers and learners.



interview with Peter Medgyes and Susan Holden

Interview with David Crystal

David crystal talks about his latest book on the glamour of grammar and the impact of Brexit on the English language.



Interview with David Crystal

Interview with Sarah Mercer

Sarah Mercer, Professor of English Language, University of Graz, Austria talks about her plenary session on language learning and teacher psychology where she describes teachers as the place where magic takes place in education and talks about her research on the professional well-being of language teachers in different contexts.



Interview with Sarah Mercer

Interview with Tim Phillips

Tim talks about the challenges involved in ensuring that teacher numbers and standards remain high despite the future demands being placed on education systems around the world.



Interview with Tim Phillips

Interview with Jeremy Harmer

Jeremy talks about teaching and coursebooks in the future. He reflects on how English language teachers need to look ahead, challenge assumptions around teaching and prepare for disruptions to teaching as we know it.



Interview with Jeremy Harmer

Interview with Clare Walsh and Lindsay Warwick

Clare and Lindsay talk about the key stages involved in teachers differentiating learning outcomes and tasks in mixed ability classrooms. They focus on learner autonomy and learning to measure their own progress. Their talk is specifically based on teaching ielts but all the advice can be transferred to any lesson.



Interview with Clare Walsh and Lindsay Warwick

Interview with Gabriel Diaz Maggioli

Following his plenary, Gabriel further discusses how teachers and organisations can approach continuous professional development. As well as answering questions from the online audience, Gabriel explores some of the realistic, practical approaches from his talk and how teachers can set their own development goals.



Interview with Gabriel Diaz Maggioli

The view of the child in an ELT context

The default position of most training is focused on the adult. As many teachers are required to teach children, their view of the learner needs to expand. This talk will present data which reveals that teachers have rarely developed a philosophy of the child, and will present techniques to help them consider children as active participants in their own learning.



The view of the child in an ELT context

Managing student confidence and expectations in mixed level IELTS classes

This talk will explore how differentiated learning in IELTS classes can help to build learner confidence and manage student expectations. We'll examine how to address differentiated goals in a busy classroom, suggest ways to introduce informed self-reflection and discuss techniques for dealing with input levels higher than a student’s language level. We’ll draw on examples from Pearson’s Expert IELTS series.



Managing student confidence and expectations in mixed level IELTS classes

Plenary session by Sarah Mercer

Sarah Mercer is currently Professor of Foreign Language Teaching at the University of Graz, Austria, where she is Head of ELT Research and Methodology and Deputy Head of the Centre for Teaching and Learning in Arts and Humanities. Her research interests include all aspects of the psychology surrounding the foreign language learning and teaching experience, focusing in particular on issues of self and identity. She is the author, co-author and co-editor of several books in this area including, Towards an Understanding of Language Learner Self-Concept, Psychology for Language Learning, Multiple Perspectives on the Self in SLA, New Directions in Language Learning Psychology, Positive Psychology in SLA, Exploring Psychology for Language Teachers (Winner of the Ben Warren Prize), and Teacher Psychology in SLA. Her current research focuses on the professional wellbeing of language teachers in a diverse range of contexts.
Connecting minds: language learner and teacher psychologies
Language learning is a deeply social and emotional undertaking for both teachers and learners. In this talk, I wish to reflect on the fundamental role played by psychology in the learning and teaching of foreign languages. Far from being an optional extra in the teaching and learning debate, we will see just how crucial an understanding of psychology is, given that people and their relationships lie at the heart of the teaching/learning interaction. While teaching materials and specific methodologies remain vitally important, it is impossible to reap the full benefits offered by such resources without those involved being psychologically in a facilitative frame of mind. Together we will consider some of the foundations of a healthy psychology in the language classroom for both teachers and learners. We will assume a socially situated understanding of psychology that challenges the division between cognition and emotion as well as the emphasis on the individual in isolation. We will focus on the centrality of social relationships, especially the connection between teachers and learners, and the role of perception in engagement with contextual opportunities. We will cover diverse aspects of psychology such as beliefs, emotions, sense of self, agency and engagement. Specifically, we will consider how we can help learners to connect mentally and emotionally to their language learning and how we can support teachers to ensure a positive level of professional well-being in their jobs. In sum, this talk aims to focus our minds on what matters most in language education: The people. 


Plenary session by Sarah Mercer

Wednesday, 5 April 2017

Outside in: bringing new technology perspectives to ELT

We talk a lot about technology in ELT but the gap between what we do, and could do, is becoming a chasm. A panel of technology experts, bringing experiences from outside the ELT world, will discuss trends such as machine translation, artificial intelligence, chatbots and future workplaces. Their perspectives will challenge our current thinking, and help us consider future possibilities.



Outside in: bringing new technology perspectives to ELT

Do students prefer native speakers?

Building fluency and comprehension in dyslexic readers

Building fluency and comprehension in dyslexic readers
This talk focuses on teaching dyslexic students reading comprehension and improving their spelling, speaking and writing skills. It explores ways to activate the inherent strengths of the dyslexic mind and deals with modern and effective methodology proposed by Israeli Association for LD People. I will share my experience on how to help dyslexic students succeed in high school.



Building fluency and comprehension in dyslexic readers

Tuesday, 4 April 2017

Writing methodology texts: bridging the research/practice gap

Writing methodology texts: bridging the research/practice gap
How do methodology writers mediate the gap between researchers and practitioners? In this talk, I explore the way a number of writers perform this bridging function, and how these principles informed the writing of The New A-Z of ELT. I will argue that similar principles should inform teacher education in general.


Writing methodology texts: bridging the research/practice gap

ELT Journal Debate

English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) is interesting for researchers, but not important for teachers and learners
As English has become the global lingua franca, there has been a lot of discussion of, and investigation into, the varied ways in which it is spoken around the world, and by different groups of speakers. But is such variation in English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) relevant to the ELT classroom? Is what we have learned about ELF important for English language teachers and learners? Our two speakers will debate the issues. Please come along, have your say, ask questions - and join in the vote.

ELT Journal Debate

Plenary session by Gabriel Diaz Maggioli

Plenary session by Gabriel Diaz Maggioli
Gabriel Diaz Maggioli is a teacher who applies the lessons learned in the classroom to his roles as writer, researcher, administrator and teacher educator. He got his BA in TESOL in Uruguay and completed Master’s and Doctoral work at the University of Bath in the UK. He has acted as consultant for international organizations such as UNICEF, UNESCO, the European Union, the Inter-American Development Bank, the US Department of State and the World Bank. A frequent presenter at local and international conferences, Gabriel has shared his theory-in-practice with colleagues in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and East Asia. He currently lives in Uruguay where he is tenured professor of TESOL Methods at the National Teacher Education College.
Empowering teachers through continued professional development: frameworks, practices and promises
The notion that language teachers need ongoing professional development opportunities should be considered a harmless platitude. Yet, as the field stands now, most of our colleagues are not provided with such opportunities as parts of their jobs. How is it then that we hear so many wonderful tales of exploration and discovery? Teachers have taken upon themselves to build these growth opportunities. In this plenary I will share some stories, and weave the plots of new stories to come by presenting a “state of the art” hawk eye view of professional development and recommending potential ways in which colleagues can help colleagues learn and develop.


Plenary session by Gabriel Diaz Maggioli

Interview with Chris Brandwood

Chris Brandwood, British Council Director of English, EU Europe discusses the demand for English post Brexit and the impact this has on English language teaching within Europe.



Interview with Chris Brandwood

Interview with Andy Hockley

Interview with Andy Hockley

Interview with Varinder Unlu

Varinder Unlu, coordinator of the new IATEFL SIG Inclusive Practices and SEN. She shares the how and why of setting this group up and discusses the importance of this relevant groups for teachers and schools.



Interview with Varinder Unlu

Interview with Marek Kiczkowiak

Marek shares his work in raising awareness of native speakerism with employers, teacher training organisations and customers. Marek looks at the need to discuss global English, address the different training needs and prepare trainees and learners expectations as best we can.



Interview with Marek Kiczkowiak

Interview with Silvana Richardson and Fiona Dunlop

Fiona Dunlop and Silvana Richardson talk about the use of open space technology as a means of running conference sessions. They also talk about CPD and the development of CPD within the modern school framework.



Interview with Silvana Richardson and Fiona Dunlop

Interview with Gavin Dudeney

Gavin talks about his workshop where he will be looking at changing teacher trainers’ focus on learning technology tools to focus more on approaches and the results you want from your learners. Teacher trainers should leave with a practical tool box.



Interview with Gavin Dudeney

Interview with Carol Read

Carol Read, ex president of IATEFL talks about coming back to Glasgow and her plenary session and workshop on values of education and teaching life skills to young learners.



Interview with Carol Read

Interview with Andy Hockley

Andy Hockley talks about the LAM SIG PCE and the debate around ethical recruiting. He also talks about the modern problems of being an ELT school manager and managing and interpreting data.  



Interview with Andy Hockley

Interview with Margit Szesztay

In coming IATEFL president Margit shares with us her main priorities and plans for the next two years. She discusses how she plans to include a larger number of newly qualified teachers in the organisation’s activities and how she will use feedback from teachers to focus their future strategies and plan how IATEFL will look in five years.





Interview with Margit Szesztay

Interview with Margit Szesztay

Interview with Margit Szesztay